Search

Browse By Annuals

ANNUALS (ALL)

FRAGRANT PLANTS

GROUND COVERS

HUMMINGBIRD GARDEN

KITCHEN GARDEN

LAVENDERS

SAGES

SUN GARDEN

THYMES

VINES

Browse by Perennials

PERENNIALS (ALL)

BUTTERFLY GARDEN

FRAGRANT PLANTS

GROUND COVERS

HUMMINGBIRD GARDEN

HYBRID MINTS

KITCHEN GARDEN

LAVENDERS

MINTS

ROSEMARY

SAGES

SHADE PLANTS

SUN GARDEN

THYMES

VINES

Cilantro
139
Price: $3.49

Detailed Description

Untitled Document

Name: Cilantro [sih-LAHN-troh]

Botanical Name: Coriandrum sativum

Zone: cool temperatures - 40 to 75 degrees are best

Bloom Time: Temps above 75 degrees

Soil: wide range of soils, well drained

Exposure: Full Sun

Description: The spice known as coriander is the seed of Coriandrum sativum and cilantro is the fresh leaf of that same plant, harvested early in its growing phase. It is a hardy annual, meaning that it completes its growing cycle in one year and it can be sown directly in the garden in early spring.

This member of the carrot family is also referred to as Chinese Parsley and Coriander. It is actually the leaves (and stems) of the Coriander plant. Cilantro has a very pungent odor and is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean and Asian cooking. The Cilantro leaves look a bit like flat Italian parsley and in fact are related. Cilantro has delicate fern-like foliage, flat clusters of pinkish white flowers and aromatic seeds. Leaves have unique flavor that is pleasing to many people. Grown for foliage and very aromatic. Cilantro is very attractive to butterflies, self-sows freely. Grows to 2 feet tall .

Care: After planting it tends to bolt to seed very quickly when the weather warms up. The best way to get both cilantro and the seeds of coriander, is to set aside an area in your garden and do succession sowings of seeds - starting early in the spring and continuing to mid-June. Coriander does not do well during the hot summer months - so let the last sowing go directly to seed. Then if you really enjoy cilantro, start sowing seeds again in September and do succession sowing until October. If you let seeds ripen and fall, your next year's early crop will be sown for you by Mother Nature.

Tip:
Fresh cilantro does not keep well, and the flavor of dried is not comparable. To store fresh coriander, pick out any wilted leaves, and put it in a jar with water like a bunch of flowers. Cover the leaves with a plastic bag and put the whole thing in the refrigerator. Change the water every two days or so, picking out any wilted leaves when you do.

Additional Information

Herb Plants Info Page

Related Products

Arugula Herb Plants
Arugula
Price: $3.49
Arugula
Spicy Globe Basil Culinary Herb Plant
Basil, Spicy Globe
Price: $3.49
Basil, Spicy Globe
Sweet Basil Culinary Herb Plants
Basil, Sweet
Price: $3.49
Basil, Sweet
Bay Tree Culinary Herb Plants
Bay Tree
Price: $3.99
Bay Tree
Chives Culinary Herb Plants
Chives
Price: $3.49
Chives

Product Reviews

(0 Ratings, 0 Reviews)

Browse By Herb Plants

Herb Plants - Culinary

Herb Plants - Fragrant

Herb Plants - Medicinal

Herb Plants - Ornamental

Geraniums

Mailing Lists




Shopping Cart
Your cart is empty.