Search

Browse By Annuals

ANNUALS (ALL)

FRAGRANT PLANTS

GROUND COVERS

HUMMINGBIRD GARDEN

KITCHEN GARDEN

LAVENDERS

SAGES

SUN GARDEN

THYMES

VINES

Browse by Perennials

PERENNIALS (ALL)

BUTTERFLY GARDEN

FRAGRANT PLANTS

GROUND COVERS

HUMMINGBIRD GARDEN

HYBRID MINTS

KITCHEN GARDEN

LAVENDERS

MINTS

ROSEMARY

SAGES

SHADE PLANTS

SUN GARDEN

THYMES

VINES

Growing/Harvesting Cilantro

How to grow/harvest cilantro

 

Cilantro has special needs to thrive in a garden. It is short lived and Cilantro will develop a flower stalk, or “bolt”, prematurely when the soil temperature exceeds 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Cilantro should be grown in early spring or fall when the weather is cool. It requires mostly full sun, although some have luck growing cilantro in morning sun and shade in the hot afternoon. One way to help keep your Cilantro plants from bolting is to grow cilantro it in the ground with plenty of mulch on top of the roots, this helps keep the soil cooler longer into the day. One other trick is to plant Cilantro very close together, shading the roots and thus keeping them cool. Under the right conditions, cilantro will last about 8-10 weeks before flowering. Cilantro will reseed itself in your garden if you allow the plants to flower and develop seeds. Harvest coriander seeds as soon as they turn brown by shaking the seed heads over a paper bag. Allow the seeds to dry and store them in airtight jars.

This is a good example of a cilantro plant that has started to go to seed.

To harvest Cilantro, wait until the plant is about 6"e; tall. Start harvesting cilantro leaves by removing the outer leaves and leaving the inside where the new leaves grow from intact. You can usually expect to get 2-3 harvests like this before the flowering stage begins. After picking the Cilantro leaves, clean and dry them thoroughly. Try storing them in the fridge in a glass of water to help keep some shelf life. Some like to wait until the Cilantro plant is full grown and then pull it up by the roots, using the whole plant at once. The roots are edible as well as the leaves of Cilantro and many enjoy adding the roots to favorite stir-fry dishes.

Check out our cilantro products at www.fragrantfields.com!

 

 

Browse By Herb Plants

Herb Plants - Culinary

Herb Plants - Fragrant

Herb Plants - Medicinal

Herb Plants - Ornamental

Geraniums

Mailing Lists




Shopping Cart
Your cart is empty.